Ko-Kwel Wellness Center Lease

Notice of Completion of Draft Tribal Environmental Impact Report

Ko-Kwel Wellness Center Lease

Dated: December 5, 2019

The Coquille Indian Tribe (“Tribe”) has adopted a Business Site Leasing Ordinance (CITC Chapter 330.320), which authorizes the Tribe to approve certain leases of its Indian trust lands.  The ordinance requires the Tribe to conduct a Tribal Environmental Impact Report (“TEIR”) for such leases, unless certain exceptions apply.  These exceptions are referred to as “categorical exclusions”.

The Tribe is evaluating a lease of certain reservation lands for a new Ko-Kwel Wellness Center (“Lease”).  The Tribe anticipates that this lease will qualify for a categorical exclusion from environmental review. That anticipated categorical exclusion, which currently being adopted, would apply to projects unanimously determined by the Lease Review Team to have no Potential Impact, as long as the Lease Review Official is a member of the Lease Review Team and the Lease Review Team’s determination is made in writing and signed by all team members.

In this case, the Tribe has voluntarily opted to prepare a Tribal Environmental Impact Report (“TEIR”).  The Tribe offers this draft voluntary TEIR as a service to help the Tribal community understand and comment on the potential environmental impacts of the Lease.

The location of the proposed Leased premises, on the Coquille Indian Reservation, is:

  • Township 25S; Range 13W; Section 31; Kilkich Indian Reservation Tract 155-T1002
  • Latitude, Longitude: 43°21’34.23″N, 124°17’46.21″W
  • Project site is immediately east of existing Coquille Health Center, 600 Miluk Drive, Coos Bay, OR 97420
  • The TEIR includes maps displaying the project site and analysis areas.

The draft TEIR is available for Tribal members, Tribal employees and Kilkich Reservation residents to view at the following locations:

Attn: Kay Collins

Coquille Indian Tribe

3050 Tremont Street

North Bend, OR 97459

 

Attn: Anne Cook

Coquille Indian Housing Authority

2678 Mexeye Loop

Coos Bay, OR 97420

 

Please bring proof of membership status, tribal employment and /or address if you wish to view this document in person.

The draft TEIR is also available for Tribal members on MyTribe at: https://portal.coquilletribe.org/

The Tribe will accept comments from the Public until Noon Monday, January 6, 2020 As used in CITC Chapter 330, “Public” is defined as any of the following:

  • Enrolled members of the Coquille Indian Tribe;
  • Individuals whom live or work on Tribal Trust Lands; and
  • Business entities or other institutions engaged in programs or activities on Tribal Trust lands (and that have a definable, concrete interest that may reasonably be affected by this proposed Lease).

Comments may be submitted two ways:

  1. In writing to:

Attn: Kay Collins

Coquille Indian Tribe

3050 Tremont Street

North Bend, OR 97459

 

  1. VIA email to: eopinion@coquilletribe.org

Comments must include your name, mailing address, physical address (if different) and must indicate status as a Tribal member, Tribal employee or Kilkich Reservation Resident.

If you have questions, please contact Tribal Executive Director Mark Johnston at (541) 756-0904 / markjohnston@coquilletribe.org

 

 

COPS grant

Tribe helps sheriff buy pickup

Aug. 28, 2019

The Coos County Sheriff’s Office has a shiny new patrol rig, courtesy of the Coquille Indian Tribe.

Because the county provides patrol help on the Kilkich Reservation, the Tribe is allowed to pass along the benefits of the federal Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) grant program.

“That gives us an opportunity to give back to the neighboring community,” said Tribal Police Chief Scott LaFevre.

LaFevre explained that the Tribe applies for a COPS grant every two to three years and usually receives about $300,000.  Though the Tribe’s own needs take first priority, LaFevre looks for opportunities to share. This year, the sheriff netted a four-wheel-drive Ford F-150.

“I think it helps immensely with our teamwork with the sheriff’s office,” LaFevre said.

Teamwork is important, because the Tribe’s four-person force can’t provide 24-hour, 365-day coverage on the reservation.

“That truck will be responding at Kilkich when we’re not here,” LaFevre said.

 

Tribal Fashion Show

Show Your Native Style 

Wearable art in traditional and contemporary American Indian designs will be on display Saturday, March 21, 2020, at a fashion show co-sponsored by the Coquille Indian Tribe and The Mill Casino-Hotel & RV Park. The show will take place from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at The Mill Casino-Hotel in North Bend, Ore.

Wearable Art With a Purpose

The Oregon Tribes Luncheon & Fashion Show is a celebration of Oregon’s Native artistry, creativity and tradition.  Scheduled the day after our Elders Honor Day, the event will bring together Elders, our tribal Youth and everyone in between.

Contemporary Indian fashion is experiencing a continuous makeover — an explosion of colors, patterns and designs, propelled by the Internet and social media. This first-ever event will highlight the evolution of Native regalia and artistry, putting a contemporary spin on traditional dress.

Oregon Tribes and individual Native designers are invited to present their original creations. Along with showcasing these talented artists, this event will serve to educate the local public about traditional and contemporary Native culture.

Tickets will be available in advance, priced at $25 for the general public, $20 for tribal members.

Want to participate?

Designers interested in participating may register here:  REGISTRATION

Questions?

For more information, contact Dennie Hunter:

(541) 297-2082

denniehunter@coquilletribe.org

 

Tribe Supports Reading Program

Grant Helps Madison Elementary

By Jillian Ward/The World

COOS BAY — The Coquille Indian Tribe has been recognized as a school sponsor for Madison Elementary.

The tribe awarded $5,000 to benefit the Start Making a Reader Today Program, better known as the SMART Program. The non-profit has provided almost 1,400 books to children at Madison where 101 children are served, including all of its kindergarten students in its K-SMART Program.

Read more in The World

 

 

2019 Community Fund Grants

Coquille Tribal Fund supports 49 groups

NORTH BEND –  The largest was $20,000, the smallest just $1,110. Whatever the size, each of the 49 grants awarded by the Coquille Tribal Community Fund this year will improve life in a local community.

Grantees and local dignitaries gathered at The Mill Casino-Hotel on Friday to celebrate the work of the grantees. This year’s tribal fund grants totaled $261,762.50. The fund, consistently the leading source of charitable grants for South Coast nonprofits, has distributed more than $6.4 million since it was launched in 2001.

The fund’s largest 2019 grant was $20,000 to the Umpqua Community Health Center, to help buy a new ultrasound machine for expectant mothers. The machine will replace an obsolete model nearly three decades old.

The smallest 2019 grant was $1,110, awarded to the Lakeside Community Presbyterian Church’s warming center project. Operating on a frugal budget, the church opens its doors to homeless people on nights when the temperature dips below freezing. The $1,110 will cover its costs for a whole year.

Money for the fund comes from a share of the tribe’s casino revenue. Each year an appointed board of tribal members and community leaders meets to review applications and decide on the awards.

The year’s board consisted of Coquille Tribal Council Secretary Linda Mecum; Coos County Commissioner Melissa Cribbins; state Rep. Gary Leif; Chelsea Burns, Coquille Economic Development Corp. Board of Directors; Joe Benetti, mayor of Coos Bay; Jon Ivy, tribal member; and Scott LaFevre, tribal member.

The tribal fund’s next application cycle will begin Sept. 1. Learn more at www.coquilletribe.org, or call fund Administrator Jackie Chambers at (541) 756-0904.

Here’s a list of 2019 grants:

  • ACCESS, $5,000
  • Bandon Historical Society Museum, $2,500
  • Bandon Showcase Inc., $1,500
  • Bear Cupboard, $7,500
  • Boys & Girls Club of Southwestern Oregon, $5,000
  • Brookings Harbor Education Foundation Inc., $3,500
  • Camp Myrtlewood, $10,000
  • CASA of Lane County, $5,000
  • Charleston Fishing Families, $5,000
  • Charleston Food Bank, $5,000
  • Chetco Activity Center, $5,000
  • Community Presbyterian Church Warming Center (Lakeside), $1,110
  • Conference of St. Vincent de Paul Society of Myrtle Creek, $2,500
  • Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Southern Oregon, $5,000
  • Coos Art Museum, $3,500
  • Coos Bay Area Zonta Service Foundation, $5,000
  • Coos Bay Seventh-day Adventist Food Pantry and Community Service, $5,000
  • Coos County Friends of Public Health, $4,500
  • Coos Watershed Association, $2,000
  • Coquille Indian Tribe Community Health Center, $10,000
  • Coquille Watershed Association, $3,525
  • Curry County Historical Society, $1,500
  • Florence Food Share, $3,000
  • Friends of Coos County Animals Inc., $5,000
  • Harmony United Methodist Church, $5,000
  • HIV Alliance, $5,000
  • Junction City Local Aid, $5,000
  • Knights of Columbus Council 1261, $5,000
  • La Clinica del Valle, $10,000
  • Little Theatre on the Bay, $5,000
  • Mapleton Food Share, $5,000
  • Oregon Childrens’ Foundation dba SMART Start Making A Reader Today, $5,000
  • Oregon Coast Community Action – Court Appointed Special Advocates, $5,000
  • Oregon Coast Community Action – South Coast Food Share (SCFS), $10,000
  • Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, $3,000
  • Peter Britt Gardens Music & Arts Festival Association, $2,000
  • Rogue Retreat, $10,000
  • Roots & Wings Community Preschool, $7,000
  • ShelterCare, $5,000
  • Smith and Bern VFW Post 6102, $10,000
  • South Coast Clambake Music Festival, $3,000
  • South Umpqua Historical Society, $5,000
  • Southwestern Oregon Veterans Outreach Inc., $4,500
  • Southwestern Oregon Workforce Investment Board, $7,000
  • Vincent de Paul Society of Lane County, $5,000
  • Sumner Rural Fire Protection District, $6,128
  • Triangle Food Box, $2,500
  • Umpqua Community Health Center, $20,000
  • Youth 71Five, $5,000

2019 Community Fund Grant List

2019 Grants

Coquille Tribal Community Fund

 

  • ACCESS, $5,000
  • Bandon Historical Society Museum, $2,500
  • Bandon Showcase Inc., $1,500
  • Bear Cupboard, $7,500
  • Boys & Girls Club of Southwestern Oregon, $5,000
  • Brookings Harbor Education Foundation Inc., $3,500
  • Camp Myrtlewood, $10,000
  • CASA of Lane County, $5,000
  • Charleston Fishing Families, $5,000
  • Charleston Food Bank, $5,000
  • Chetco Activity Center, $5,000
  • Community Presbyterian Church Warming Center (Lakeside), $1,110
  • Conference of St. Vincent de Paul Society of Myrtle Creek, $2,500
  • Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Southern Oregon, $5,000
  • Coos Art Museum, $3,500
  • Coos Bay Area Zonta Service Foundation, $5,000
  • Coos Bay Seventh-day Adventist Food Pantry and Community Service, $5,000
  • Coos County Friends of Public Health, $4,500
  • Coos Watershed Association, $2,000
  • Coquille Indian Tribe Community Health Center, $10,000
  • Coquille Watershed Association, $3,525
  • Curry County Historical Society, $1,500
  • Florence Food Share, $3,000
  • Friends of Coos County Animals Inc., $5,000
  • Harmony United Methodist Church, $5,000
  • HIV Alliance, $5,000
  • Junction City Local Aid, $5,000
  • Knights of Columbus Council 1261, $5,000
  • La Clinica del Valle, $10,000
  • Little Theatre on the Bay, $5,000
  • Mapleton Food Share, $5,000
  • Oregon Childrens’ Foundation dba SMART Start Making A Reader Today, $5,000
  • Oregon Coast Community Action – Court Appointed Special Advocates, $5,000
  • Oregon Coast Community Action – South Coast Food Share (SCFS), $10,000
  • Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, $3,000
  • Peter Britt Gardens Music & Arts Festival Association, $2,000
  • Rogue Retreat, $10,000
  • Roots & Wings Community Preschool, $7,000
  • ShelterCare, $5,000
  • Smith and Bern VFW Post 6102, $10,000
  • South Coast Clambake Music Festival, $3,000
  • South Umpqua Historical Society, $5,000
  • Southwestern Oregon Veterans Outreach Inc., $4,500
  • Southwestern Oregon Workforce Investment Board, $7,000
  • Vincent de Paul Society of Lane County, $5,000
  • Sumner Rural Fire Protection District, $6,128
  • Triangle Food Box, $2,500
  • Umpqua Community Health Center, $20,000
  • Youth 71Five, $5,000

Tribe Supports ‘Girls Who Code’

Volunteer Kendall Smith, left, coaches Kiyanna Day and Mackenzie Thompson during a “Girls Who Code” session at the Boys and Girls Club. The program, sponsored by the Southwestern Oregon Workforce Investment Board, was one of 49 recipients of Coquille Tribal Community Fund grants in 2019.

Program empowers middle-school girls

 March 2019

 COOS BAY – If technology is the future, sixth-grader Jade Moon plans to be ready.

Every Wednesday afternoon, Jade logs onto a laptop and joins other girls to learn the fundamentals of computer programming. Their after-school class, “Girls Who Code,” encourages middle-school girls to explore careers in the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering and math.

“I just love the fact that I’m learning all this stuff that I can use in the future,” Jade said. “If I decide to be a programmer, I can.”

Girls Who Code is a nationwide organization that aims to close the national gender gap in technology. With nearly 90,000 girls involved nationwide, the movement challenges the antiquated notion that math and science are mostly for boys.

The local chapter meets weekly at the Boys & Girls Club in Coos Bay. It’s being supported this year by a $7,000 grant from the Coquille Tribal Community Fund. Jackie Chambers, the Coquille Tribal member who administers the fund, is enthusiastic about it.

“Part of the Coquille Indian Tribe’s focus is to help our young people get an education and advance in life,” Chambers said. “We’re proud to make this contribution, and we can’t wait to see what these girls accomplish in their lives.”

The women who lead and teach the local group use words such as “empowerment” and “sisterhood” to describe the spirit of Girls Who Code. They say their goal is to break the cultural barrier that still discourages girls from pursuing STEM subjects.

The program’s website boasts of building “the largest pipeline of future female engineers in the United States.”

“It’s a huge tool for the future,” said Courtney DuMond, a volunteer in the local program.

On one recent Wednesday, the girls learned about using a simple programming language to create a quiz game. They also learned the real-world skill of establishing SMART goals. (SMART stands for specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-bound.)

Each year the girls are asked to apply their technological lessons to a project with social implications. This year’s team chose anxiety and depression. They’ll address the subject with tools such as building a website or making a video. Thus they learn to use technology while practicing teamwork, problem solving and compassion.

“I’d like to get the people who have depression and anxiety — and sometimes both – some help,” Jade said.

About the grants

Girls Who Code was one of 13 education-related programs receiving grants from the Coquille Tribal Community Fund in 2019. The 13 grants, totaling $69,025, were part of the $261,762 being distributed to 49 organizations during the fund’s annual “Grant Week.” Since 2001, the tribal fund has distributed more than $6.4 million, using revenue from The Mill Casino-Hotel & RV Park.