A Coho Homecoming

In a Nature Conservancy video, Coquille Tribal biologist Helena Linnell talks about the Working Landscapes project, which is restoring salmon habitat in the Coquille Valley. View video 

You can read the story of a historic moment —the day when the gates opened to restore tidewaters that had been absent for more than a century.  Click here to read 

Learn more about the tidelands project on the Working Landscapes website.  Click here

 

 

Develop SB13 Coquille Indian Tribe Culture Curriculum

Contact/Questions: Please Email your questions to Bridgett Wheeler  Culture, Education, and Learning Services Director bridgettwheeler@coquilletribe.org

**RFP due date 5:00PM on October 26, 2018

Email electronic copies of proposal to:

Bridgett Wheeler bridgettwheeler@coquilletribe.org

Arlea Grenade arleagrenade@coquilletribe.org

 

RFP DEVELOP SB13 COQUILLE INDIAN TRIBE CULTURE CURRICULUM

CONTRACT-1-for-Services-MAIN-06-2016

 

 

 

Coquille Tribal Community Fund

Tribal fund tackles community needs 

 

NORTH BEND – Fifty-seven deserving community organizations have received grants from the Coquille Tribal Community Fund, serving causes as diverse as feeding the hungry, disposing of unused prescription drugs, and performing Shakespeare in a city park.

Supported by revenue from The Mill Casino-Hotel, the fund distributed $291,164 in grants at a luncheon on Friday, March 2. With this year’s total included, the fund has awarded more than $6.1 million since its launch in 2001. During that time it has been Coos County’s largest consistent supporter of community organizations.

Founded in the Pacific Northwest Indian spirit of potlatch, the Coquille Tribal Community Fund seeks to strengthen the community by improving opportunities and lives throughout the region.

Here are links to stories about some great examples of 2018 grantees:

Fresh Alliance

 

 

 

Myrtle Point Fire Department

 

 

 

 

 

Egyptian Theatre

 

 

 

 

Coos Watershed Association

 

 

 

Clambake Music Festival

 

 

 

Click here for more about the community fund.

 

Clambake Music Festival

Members of Marshfield High School’s Swing Club practice their moves in preparation for “Music in the Schools.”

When school

SWINGS

Clambake Festival brings diverse music to local students

(Published March 1, 2018)

Most local kids have heard rock music. Also hip-hop. And country, of course.

Zydeco? Not so likely.

Next week, students from throughout Coos County will sample this Louisiana-born confection of Cajun, French Creole, blues and Afro-Caribbean influences, courtesy of the South Coast Clambake Music Festival.  It promises to be tasty.

“I think what the kids will really think is cool is the washboard,” said Janet Saint, a retired teacher and Clambake board member. “They don’t even know what a washboard is.”

For three decades, Clambake has celebrated jazz, swing and other genres of “America’s original music.” A key element is Clambake’s “Music in the Schools” program, which is backed this year by a $3,000 grant from the Coquille Tribal Community Fund.

“This is an important music program that also brings out a little bit of history to our kids and our community,” said Jackie Chambers, a Coquille Tribal member who coordinates the tribal fund. She recalled attending a Music in the Schools event last year:

“Seeing kids of every age get up out of their seats and dance to music they may have never even heard was a sight to see,” she said. “The program was very interactive, exciting, and fun all around.”

Saint said experiencing a live show not only inspires appreciation for music, it also shows that playing in a band is “cool,” and it teaches the value of mastering a craft.

Visiting bands often invite the kids to sing along or dance. Teachers might even be pulled onto the dance floor.

“Oh my gosh, the kids love it,” Saint said. “Most of the kids will say it’s their favorite assembly of the year.”

This year, the kids will hear Gator Nation, a California band whose music encompasses zydeco, Cajun, and New Orleans rhythm and blues.

“A lot of these kids where we live – they’ve never gotten to see that, and maybe they never will,” Saint said.

Another attraction will be the presence of Marshfield High School’s Swing Club. The teen dancers (coached by Saint) will show the younger kids an extra reason to relish music.

Clambake is one of five artistic and cultural organizations receiving grants from the Coquille Tribal Community Fund this year.  The five grants account for $16,200 of the more than $290,000 being awarded for 2018.

2018 Arts and Culture Grants

South Coast Clambake Jazz Festival  $3,000
Little Theatre on the Bay  $5,000
The Logos Players  $3,200
Coos Art Museum  $3,000
North Bend School District

Indian Education Program

 $2,000