Hatchery gets a boost

Tribe’s efforts aid Coquille River brood stock collection

BANDON – More than 500 hours of work is paying off with more than a tenfold increase in the Bandon Hatchery’s 2021 collection of fall Chinook salmon brood stock.

Last year, the state-owned hatchery secured only three breeding pairs of the iconic but increasingly scarce fish. This year, with help from Coquille Tribal employees and community volunteers, the number rose to 34 pairs.

“This is something to celebrate,” said tribal Chairman Brenda Meade. “This is an accomplishment.”

The Coquille River’s fall run of Chinook salmon is an ancient and treasured resource for the tribe, but numbers of fish returning from the ocean have crashed in the past decade. After the Coquille Tribal Council declared an emergency this summer, the tribe partnered with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife in a campaign to rescue the fishery.

The project missed the tribe’s goal of 70 breeding pairs, mainly because female salmon were in short supply. Many of the 88 captured males will die as bachelors. Helena Linnell, the tribe’s biological planning and operations manager, blamed the imbalance on “the luck of the draw.”

Still, this year’s increased brood stock is encouraging. With 34 female fish averaging 3,400 eggs each, the hatchery will produce dramatically more juvenile fish – known as “smolts” – than in recent years.


Photo: Tribal biologist Helena Linnell helps hoist a newly netted salmon to the waiting hands of Tribal Council member Don Garrett. He’ll put the fish in a tank for transport to the hatchery.

To make that possible, tribal staff members and community volunteers spent long hours in and on the river. They herded and netted adult salmon, they worked alongside ODFW’s hatchery staff, and they “electrofished” for invasive predators, to create a more hospitable home for smolts.

This year’s spawning season will end soon, and Linnell’s team is looking toward 2022.

Salmon hatch in rivers but mature at sea, returning as adults to spawn and die. Linnell said this year’s efforts focused on “harvest augmentation” – breeding and releasing more hatchery-produced smolts. Doing so yields more adults for tribal members and sportsmen to catch, but it doesn’t restore the native population of wild fish.

 The tribe advocates a more ambitious agenda next year, including long-term enhancement of upstream habitat for wild salmon to spawn and smolts to grow.

Habitat enhancement means lowering water temperature and reducing sediment, by planting trees and altering agricultural practices. Those goals depend on the cooperation of willing landowners, but even incremental changes would be a “gigantic” step, Linnell said.

More electrofishing is also on 2022’s agenda. Electrofishing uses a specially equipped boat to shock invasive smallmouth and striped bass, so that they can be scooped up and eliminated. The more bass are killed, the more smolts can survive to adulthood.

Linnell emphasized that salmon restoration requires collaboration among state and local agencies, private organizations and the public. Meade expressed gratitude to the many groups and individuals who have stepped up as community partners.

“We have had tremendous outreach from the community,” Meade said.

To make a difference for future generations of fish and humans, those efforts will need to continue.

New tribal officers

Coquille Tribe installs new leaders

 

The Coquille Indian Tribe has a new chief and a new secretary-treasurer after recent elections.

Chief Jason Younker, a University of Oregon faculty member, was sworn in on Oct. 29. Jackie Chambers, who previously managed the tribe’s community grants program, was sworn in as secretary-treasurer.

Younker replaces Chief Don Ivy, who died in July. As chief, Younker will hold one of seven seats on the Coquille Tribal Council, while serving as the tribe’s cultural and spiritual leader and voice.

Younker grew up on the shores of Coos Bay’s South Slough. He holds three graduate degrees, including a doctorate in cultural anthropology. He is an associate professor of anthropology at the University of Oregon, where he also is an assistant vice president and assistant to the president for tribal sovereignty and government-to-government relations.

He chairs the board of Oregon’s Chemawa Indian school and is past president of the Association of Indigenous Archaeologists.

Chambers, a lifelong Coos County resident, is devoted to serving and strengthening local communities. Before her election to the Tribal Council, she served the tribe as administrator of the Coquille Tribal Community Fund, which awards hundreds of thousands of dollars in grants each year.

She also is a co-founder and president of Charleston Fishing Families, a nonprofit that helps commercial fishing families in times of need. She graduated from the Bay Area Chamber of Commerce’s Leadership Coos program in 2020.

She replaces former Secretary-Treasurer Linda Mecum, who retired after seven years on the Tribal Council.

Along with Chambers and Younker, two Tribal Council incumbents were sworn in for new terms. Chairman Brenda Meade and Rep. Laurabeth Barton both retained their seats in recent elections.

Masked up for safety, four Coquille Tribal Council members take the oath of office on Oct. 29. From left, Jason Younker was elected Oct. 15 as chief; Jackie Chambers is the new secretary-treasurer; Laurabeth Barton retained her seat as representative No. 1; and Brenda Meade was re-elected as chairman. At right, Vice Chair Jon Ivy administers the oath.

Spawning

Fishing for the future

Tribal staff and volunteers work to rebuild salmon run

BANDON, Ore. – “Buck.”

“Buck.”

“Jack.”

“Buck.”

Tuesdays are spawning days at the Bandon Hatchery, and Manager David Welch is sorting salmon. Waist-deep in a holding pond, he catches fish in a net, glances at each one, and tosses it into a pen.

Adult male “bucks” go into one pen. “Jacks” – overeager male adolescents that swam home a year early – go in another. “Green” females, still a few weeks premature for spawning, land in yet another.

When Welch finds a fully mature, spawning-ready female, he holds her up for helper Kassandra Rippee. Armed with a wooden club, Rippee steels herself for her task.

This is the chilly, wet, sometimes bloody business of saving the Coquille River’s fall Chinook salmon. Two months ago, the Coquille Indian Tribal Council declared an emergency, pledging the tribe’s resources to save the alarmingly depleted fishery.

Rippee is the tribe’s archaeologist and historic preservation officer. On this day, however, she and two other tribal employees are fish wranglers, partnering with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s hatchery team.

Tribal employees, tribal members and other volunteers were busy throughout October, mostly gathering fish for the hatchery. Sometimes they stretched nets across creek channels. Other times they waded upstream, herding fish ahead of them – and away from the threat of hungry seals.

The tribe’s project, led by tribal biologist Helena Linnell, is showing promise. At the end of October, 81 salmon had arrived at the hatchery. That’s a long way from the goal of 70 breeding pairs, but it far exceeds 2020’s total of just 16 fish. And the season is not yet finished.

Another bright spot: The presence of 13 jacks suggests a stronger run in 2022, when those jacks’ brothers and sisters will show up as adults.

At the hatchery, Welch leads the crew through a time-honored procedure. Three female salmon are ready for spawning today. So Rod Knoebel, an ODFW senior technician, squeezes sperm from three adult males. Todd Martin, a tribal spouse who works with Rippee in historical preservation, catches the liquid in separate paper cups.

Next, Welch and Knoebel harvest eggs from the three lifeless females – typically between 2,000 and 5,000 per fish. Each batch is separated into three plastic dishes, to be fertilized with sperm from all three males. This process, Welch explains, creates nine parent groups, maximizing the new salmon generation’s genetic diversity.

Whether in the wild or in a hatchery, spawning is the final act of a salmon’s life. After collecting tissue samples for laboratory testing, Welch will return the carcasses to the river, to decompose and nourish new life.

The hatchery normally has three employees, but one position is temporarily vacant. So the tribe’s collaboration is particularly welcome.

“I don’t know where we’d be without that,” Welch says.

Tribal employees are clearly passionate about the work. Biologist Linnell and technician Kristopher Murphy have worked long hours throughout October. Murphy, a tribal member, estimates 10-15 hours a day, with rarely a day off. But no complaints.

“I’m all for it,” he says. “I want to help as much as I can.”

Linnell, a 15-year veteran of fisheries work, agrees: “This is a labor of love and one I am very passionate about. I will work as hard as I can, so we can once again harvest fall Chinook and see more of them back on the spawning grounds.”

Fish wrangling will continue through November. Prospective volunteers should email salmon@coquilletribe.org.

 

Photo captions: 

  1. Helena Linnell, the Coquille Tribe’s biological operations and planning manager, secures a newly netted salmon in Ferry Creek, while her helpers turn toward the next target.
  2. Tribal employee Kassandra Rippee stands ready for an unpleasant but necessary chore, readying a female salmon for egg harvesting.
  3. Tribal staff member Todd Martin, right, works with ODFW’s Rod Knoebel to collect sperm from a male salmon. The salmon’s red color indicates its readiness for spawning. Behind him, Hatchery Manager David Welch watches from a holding pond.

  4. With clicker in hand, tribal member Kristopher Murphy counts salmon eggs at the Bandon Hatchery.

     

Seining, Sept. 28

A hopeful start for 2021 spawning

Coquille River salmon run needs robust brood stock


BANDON – A rarely used technique gave a welcome boost to early prospects for successful salmon spawning in the Coquille River.

Coquille Indian Tribe employees and community volunteers gathered Tuesday, Sept. 28, in downtown Bandon, where Ferry Creek enters the Coquille River. Using a wide net, they corralled six adult Chinook salmon for delivery to the Bandon Hatchery.

“As we know, the numbers of returning fall chinook have drastically declined to record-setting lows,” said Helena Linnell, the tribe’s biological operations and planning manager. “And so, the effort to secure brood stock is vitally important to making sure that this fishery continues into the future for the next seven generations.”

 

Above, Tribal Council member Don Garrett celebrates a successful evening of salmon seining.

At left, volunteers haul in the net.

Last year, just 16 fall Chinook reached the Bandon Hatchery to spawn.  Linnell called this week’s event “a great first step.” She and other officials hope the six captured fish are the vanguard of a more robust 2021 spawning season.

Fall Chinook salmon have grown so scarce on the Coquille River that the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife allowed no Chinook fishing this year. The tribe, alarmed by the salmon run’s decline, recently proposed to co-manage the salmon fishery, offering its own resources to augment ODFW’s budget.

The Sept. 28 event was an example of increasing collaboration to save the fall run. The occasion attracted an assortment of tribal employees and community volunteers, including local port officials and members of the Oregon Anglers Alliance. ODFW provided a specially equipped boat, the net, and a truck carrying a holding tank.

The net, known as a seine, is long and narrow, with floats at its top and weights on its bottom. Linnell and a helper deployed it from a boat, and men in waders dragged it through the shallows. They formed a moving, flexible fence, slowly herding the fish toward shore.

With the salmon increasingly boxed in, team members gently caught each fish in a landing net. Then they hustled it up the beach to the truck. The six salmon were deposited in the Bandon Hatchery’s holding pond, about two miles upstream.

Tribal biologist Helena Linnell, aided by Bandon Port Manager Jeff Griffin, totes a salmon to a holding tank.

Seining salmon for brood stock is an unusual tactic in salmon management, and using it shows just how concerned biologists are about the Coquille River’s fall run. With increased water temperatures and predatory seals to contend with, fish that gather at the mouth of the creek might or might not reach the hatchery on their own.

“We had the opportunity to take some of those early returners and get them out of an inhospitable situation,” said tribal Chairman Brenda Meade.

Meade, whose ancestors regarded salmon as their own seagoing cousins, was delighted by the season’s hopeful start.

“It was the first sign of our relatives returning,” Meade said.

The bulk of the fall run normally comes in early October. As the spawning season proceeds, the Coquille Indian Tribe plans to recruit and deploy more volunteers.

Healing the Coquille River

Our salmon don’t have to disappear

Jii-la! (Greetings, friends!)

I’m Brenda Meade, chairman of the Coquille Indian Tribe. Coquille River salmon have nourished my people for countless generations. Our ancestors have  relished and revered these amazing fish since time began.

But a tragedy has struck in the past few years. Fall Chinook salmon have nearly disappeared from the Coquille River. 

Barely a decade ago, in 2010, more than 30,000 fall run Chinook returned to spawn in the river. In recent years, that number has shrunk to just a few hundred. These wonderful fish are on the edge of extinction.


What’s killing our salmon?

Several issues have come together to cause this tragedy:

  • Invasive bass species devour juvenile salmon on their way to the ocean.
  • Year after year, ODFW’s brood stock collection falls short of its goals, while seals feast on adult salmon returning to spawn in the river.
  • Pollution, sediment and warmer water impede the salmon life cycle.
  • Old, deteriorated fish hatcheries produce too few smolts.
  • Rigid state policies prevent effective management.
  • The Coquille River is a low priority in the state budget.

We’re stepping up

Despite these challenges, we believe the Coquille River’s fall Chinook salmon still can be saved. In the summer of 2021, the Coquille Tribe proposed to partner with the State of Oregon on this issue.

We are developing a new kind of cooperative relationship with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife – to address the salmon crisis, and ultimately to co-manage the Coquille watershed. We will collaborate with state and local officials, landowners and sportsmen to clean up the river, thwart the predators, revitalize the hatcheries and restore habitat.


How it’s going

Together with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife plus local volunteers, we collected 34 breeding pairs of fall Chinook salmon in 2021. That’s a great first step: 1,000 percent better than 2020. See details below.

Hatchery gets a boost (Nov. 22)

Wet, chilly work (Nov. 1)

A hopeful start (Sept. 28)

 


Ways you can help

  • Write Gov. Kate BrownAsk her to make the Coquille River’s salmon a priority. 
  • Volunteer to help –  We’ll need help with the hatchery, habitat projects and more. Or just let us list you as a Community Partner.
  • Catch some bass Stripers and smallmouth bass are bad for salmon, but they’re good for dinner, and the Coquille River has no limit on them.  Until Oct. 31, you can even spear smallmouth. 
  • Share your story –  Tell us your memories of salmon fishing on the Coquille River. 

Community partners

City of Bandon

“We join the Coquille Indian Tribe in sounding the alarm about the salmon’s plight.”  Full text

_____________________________

City of Myrtle Point

“In just the past decade, what previously was a lively sport fishery has dwindled to almost no fish at all.” Full text

_______________________________

Bandon Chamber

“When the shocking news came this spring from ODF&W that the Coquille River would be completely closed to all salmon fishing in 2021, it spelled more disaster for our community.”  Full text

___________________________

Port of Bandon

“We urge your support to rescue this ancient and cherished resource from extinction.” Full text

_____________________________

Coquille Watershed Association

“In the face of climate change, land use and water quality issues, it is critical to act now to reverse alarming trends in the watershed.” Full text

_____________________________

Shoreline Education and Awareness

“Limited resources have hobbled the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife efforts to restore the Coquille River’s Chinook population. The Coquille Tribe’s experience, motivation and resources are essential for restoring the salmon population in the river.” Full text

_____________________________

Coos County Commissioners

“Cooperative management offers our best possible hope for success in saving the fall-run Chinook salmon and improving the health the watershed.” Full text

___________________________________

City of Coquille

“Combining resources and involving a more vested local voice and action plan can prove to be very effective.” Full text

______________________________________

City of Powers

“We urge you to accept the tribe’s help and build an effective coalition to heal our watershed.” Full text

___________________________________

Port of Coquille River

“Already this fall, we are seeing positive results from the tribe’s participation and leadership in
organizing a cooperative local response.” Full text

___________________________________

Bay Area Chamber

“We join other local voices to endorse the Coquille Tribe’s co-management proposal.” Full text

___________________________________

2022 Grants

Coquille Indian Tribe Offers Grants

Aug. 24, 2021

NORTH BEND – After focusing on pandemic-related projects in 2021, the Coquille Tribal Community Fund will return to supporting a broad range of community programs in 2022.

“We felt the need to assist the local COVID-19 response last time,” said tribal Chairman Brenda Meade. “In our new grant cycle, we’ll still consider COVID-related projects, but we also want to serve a variety of community needs.”

The tribe shared $266,107 with more than 60 community organizations and projects in southwestern Oregon in 2021. All the 2021 grants targeted pandemic-related expenses of local and regional organizations. 

The grant recipients included food pantries, homeless programs, museums, community centers, veterans groups, services for children and even a couple of music programs.

“It’s a huge privilege to be able to help so many outstanding organizations and projects,” Meade said.

Master Gardener Marrie Caldiero of Coos Bay washes her hands while volunteering at the Coos Bay Farmers Market. The Coquille Tribal Community Fund provided $3,640 for the market to rent six mobile hand-washing stations – a requirement for staying open during the pandemic. ‘Basically we couldn’t have the market without the hand-washing stations,’ said Market Manager Melissa Hasart. The market was one of 60-plus community organizations that shared more than a quarter-million dollars in grants this year.

 

The biggest share of the money, about $97,000, went to Coos County organizations. Lane County groups received about $52,000, Jackson County $44,000, Douglas County $33,000, and Curry County $33,000.

The five counties make up the Coquille Tribe’s congressionally designated service area, based on significant populations of tribal members living in each county. The grants are funded by a share of annual revenue from The Mill Casino-Hotel & RV Park in North Bend.

The tribal fund is one of southwestern Oregon’s leading sources of community grants, distributing more than $7 million over the past two decades.

The fund will accept letters of inquiry for its upcoming grant cycle during September and October from organizations in all five counties. As in years past, the 2022 grants will focus on seven categories: education, public safety, arts and culture, environment, historic preservation, health and gaming addiction.

“We give big grants and little ones,” said Jackie Chambers, the fund’s administrator. “We encourage all kinds of projects and programs to apply.”

Letters of inquiry for the 2022 grants are due Oct. 31. Organizations whose letters are accepted will be invited to submit formal applications by Nov. 30. Grants will be announced in late February or early March.

For more information, visit the tribal fund website at www.coquilletribalfund.org, or contact Chambers at jackiechambers@coquilletribe.org or (541) 756-0904, ext. 1201.

Click here to see a list of all 2021 grants.

Community Fund Grants, 2021

2021 Award List

Coquille Tribal Community Fund

The Coquille Indian Tribe distributed more than a quarter-million dollars in community grants in 2021, specifically targeting organizations affected by COVID-19. Here’s how the money was used:

Coos County

  1. All Tribes Mental Health Services Inc. received $5,000 to provide free mental health services to low-income clients.
  2. Alternative Youth Activities received $5,000 for a quarantine room at the old Charleston School.
  3. Bandon Historical Society Museum received $2,610 for a secure offsite storage unit.
  4. Bay Area Chamber of Commerce received $750 for a laptop computer to enable Zoom meetings.
  5. Bay Area Hospital Cancer Center received $1,500 for gift cards to help patients attend appointments.
  6. Bob Belloni Ranch Inc. received $3,000 to buy thermometers and telehealth counseling equipment.
  7. Charleston Fishing Families received $7,000 to support operating costs.
  8. Community Coalition of Empire (CCE) received $1,560 to support the flower basket program.
  9. Coos Bay Downtown Association received $3,640 for hand-washing stations during the farmers market.
  10. Coos History Museum received $5,000 to upgrade internet service.
  11. The Coos Health & Wellness South Coast Older Adult Behavioral Health Initiative received $2,700 to advertise about mental illness, isolation and loneliness.
  12. The Coquille Indian Tribe’s Culture, Education, and Learning Services (CELS) Department received $1,574 to buy picnic tables for Effie Acres, a riverfront property designated for use by tribal youth.
  13. The Coquille Indian Tribe’s Ko-Kwel Wellness Center received $5,000 for fitness equipment.
  14. The Egyptian Theatre Preservation Association received $4,630 to buy plexiglass, sanitizing sprayers, signage and other pandemic-related items.
  15. Friends of the Lakeside Public Library received $1,500 to support a summer reading program.
  16. Knights of Columbus Council 1261 of North Bend received $3,000 for a food basket program.
  17. The Mingus Park Pool Board received $3,347 for a vacuum to clean the pool.
  18. Pacific Pregnancy Clinic received $3,150 for prenatal vitamins.
  19. Powers Food Pantry received $7,200 for operating costs and food purchases.
  20. Sea Breeze Harmony Chorus received $1,765 to buy masks for singers.
  21. SMART Reading received $5,000 to provide books for children.
  22. The Bandon Community Child Care Center received $5,000 for a used modular facility.
  23. Southwestern Oregon Veterans Outreach Inc. received $2,500 for emergency food, shelter, clothing and transportation.
  24. The Nancy Devereux Center received $7,500 to support meal services.
  25. The SAFE Project received $4,099 for technology and safety at an emergency shelter program.
  26. Harmony United Methodist Church received $3,500 for the Blossom Gulch snack pack program.

Curry County

  1. Brookings Harbor Community Helpers received $5,000 to buy items such as personal protective equipment, diapers and feminine hygiene products.
  2. Christian Help of Gold Beach Inc. received $2,500 to support operating costs.
  3. The community garden at St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church received $5,975 for fencing, irrigation and raised garden beds.
  4. Curry Historical Society received $4,000 for safety improvements and building upgrades.
  5. Gold Beach Community Center received $5,000 for a senior nutrition program.
  6. Harmony & Me Music Outreach received $10,000 for music programming.
  7. The Common Good received $1,000 to distribute food boxes.

Douglas County

  1. Camp Millennium received $3,000 for “Camp Boxes” for the 2021 virtual camp, including toys, books, games and cooking items.
  2. Cobb Children’s Learning Center received $10,000 to support operating costs.
  3. Family Faith And Relationship Advocates (FARA) received $9,500 for batterers intervention and parenting classes.
  4. Lower Umpqua Community Center Inc. received $5,000 to operate a senior meal program.
  5. The Friendly Kitchen/Meals on Wheels of Roseburg received $3,000.
  6. Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter 805 received $2,500 for color guard gear.

Jackson County

  1. CASA of Jackson County received $2,500 for printed materials regarding the Indian Child Welfare Act.
  2. Consumer Credit Counseling of Southern Oregon received $5,000 for credit counseling for low-income families.
  3. Hearts with a Mission received $3,000 to address youth depression, isolation and abandonment.
  4. Jackson County Fuel Committee received $5,000 to rebuild a burned office.
  5. Jacksonville Community Center received $6,900 for operating expenses.
  6. Medford Gospel Mission received $10,627 to buy food and kitchen equipment.
  7. Rogue Valley Children’s Discovery Museum received $3,000 to distribute 4,000 Kid Time From Home kits.
  8. Rogue Valley Mentoring received $3,000 for supplies and mentor support for youth.
  9. Roots and Wings Child Development received $3,000 for general operating support.
  10. SO Derby received $2,000 to help reopen a rented facility for skaters.

Lane County

  1. Beacon of Hope Alano Club received $2,000 for operating costs.
  2. Bridgeway House received $5,000 to buy laptops and tablets for hybrid learning.
  3. Eugene Science Center received $5,000 to help reopen the center and resume STEM education.
  4. Every Child Lane County received $5,000 to supply beds, bedding, car seats and cribs to vulnerable families.
  5. Florence Food Share received $1,080 to replace canopies.
  6. Junction City Local Aid received $4,000 for food items and staffing.
  7. Kids FIRST received $5,000 to support a mental health program.
  8. Oregon Coast Military Museum received $3,000 to upgrade lighting.
  9. ShelterCare received $5,000 to help install ductless heating and cooling.
  10. Springfield Young Readers received $2,500 to buy and ship books.
  11. SquareOne Villages received $9,000 to add electrical wiring and wall heaters at Opportunity Village Eugene.
  12. Lane Senior Support Coalition Corp. received $5,000 to help low-income seniors.

Regional

  1. Oregon Energy Fund received $5,000 for emergency energy bill aid in Coos and Curry counties.
  2. The ALS Association Oregon and SW Washington Chapter received $2,500 for support services to approximately 75 families.

Coos County

  1. All Tribes Mental Health Services Inc. received $5,000 to provide free mental health services to low-income clients.
  2. Alternative Youth Activities received $5,000 for a quarantine room at the old Charleston School.
  3. Bandon Historical Society Museum received $2,610 for a secure offsite storage unit.
  4. Bay Area Chamber of Commerce received $750 for a laptop computer to enable Zoom meetings.
  5. Bay Area Hospital Cancer Center received $1,500 for gift cards to help patients attend appointments.
  6. Bob Belloni Ranch Inc. received $3,000 to buy thermometers and telehealth counseling equipment.
  7. Charleston Fishing Families received $7,000 to support operating costs.
  8. Community Coalition of Empire (CCE) received $1,560 to support the flower basket program.
  9. Coos Bay Downtown Association received $3,640 for hand-washing stations during the farmers market.
  10. Coos History Museum received $5,000 to upgrade internet service.
  11. The Coos Health & Wellness South Coast Older Adult Behavioral Health Initiative received $2,700 to advertise about mental illness, isolation and loneliness.
  12. The Coquille Indian Tribe’s Culture, Education, and Learning Services (CELS) Department received $1,574 to buy picnic tables for Effie Acres, a riverfront property designated for use by tribal youth.
  13. The Coquille Indian Tribe’s Ko-Kwel Wellness Center received $5,000 for fitness equipment.
  14. The Egyptian Theatre Preservation Association received $4,630 to buy plexiglass, sanitizing sprayers, signage and other pandemic-related items.
  15. Friends of the Lakeside Public Library received $1,500 to support a summer reading program.
  16. Knights of Columbus Council 1261 of North Bend received $3,000 for a food basket program.
  17. The Mingus Park Pool Board received $3,347 for a vacuum to clean the pool.
  18. Pacific Pregnancy Clinic received $3,150 for prenatal vitamins.
  19. Powers Food Pantry received $7,200 for operating costs and food purchases.
  20. Sea Breeze Harmony Chorus received $1,765 to buy masks for singers.
  21. SMART Reading received $5,000 to provide books for children.
  22. The Bandon Community Child Care Center received $5,000 for a used modular facility.
  23. Southwestern Oregon Veterans Outreach Inc. received $2,500 for emergency food, shelter, clothing and transportation.
  24. The Nancy Devereux Center received $7,500 to support meal services.
  25. The SAFE Project received $4,099 for technology and safety at an emergency shelter program.
  26. Harmony United Methodist Church received $3,500 for the Blossom Gulch snack pack program.

Curry County

  1. Brookings Harbor Community Helpers received $5,000 to buy items such as personal protective equipment, diapers and feminine hygiene products.
  2. Christian Help of Gold Beach Inc. received $2,500 to support operating costs.
  3. The community garden at St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church received $5,975 for fencing, irrigation and raised garden beds.
  4. Curry Historical Society received $4,000 for safety improvements and building upgrades.
  5. Gold Beach Community Center received $5,000 for a senior nutrition program.
  6. Harmony & Me Music Outreach received $10,000 for music programming.
  7. The Common Good received $1,000 to distribute food boxes.

Douglas County

  1. Camp Millennium received $3,000 for “Camp Boxes” for the 2021 virtual camp, including toys, books, games and cooking items.
  2. Cobb Children’s Learning Center received $10,000 to support operating costs.
  3. Family Faith And Relationship Advocates (FARA) received $9,500 for batterers intervention and parenting classes.
  4. Lower Umpqua Community Center Inc. received $5,000 to operate a senior meal program.
  5. The Friendly Kitchen/Meals on Wheels of Roseburg received $3,000.
  6. Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter 805 received $2,500 for color guard gear.

Jackson County

  1. CASA of Jackson County received $2,500 for printed materials regarding the Indian Child Welfare Act.
  2. Consumer Credit Counseling of Southern Oregon received $5,000 for credit counseling for low-income families.
  3. Hearts with a Mission received $3,000 to address youth depression, isolation and abandonment.
  4. Jackson County Fuel Committee received $5,000 to rebuild a burned office.
  5. Jacksonville Community Center received $6,900 for operating expenses.
  6. Medford Gospel Mission received $10,627 to buy food and kitchen equipment.
  7. Rogue Valley Children’s Discovery Museum received $3,000 to distribute 4,000 Kid Time From Home kits.
  8. Rogue Valley Mentoring received $3,000 for supplies and mentor support for youth.
  9. Roots and Wings Child Development received $3,000 for general operating support.
  10. SO Derby received $2,000 to help reopen a rented facility for skaters.

Lane County

  1. Beacon of Hope Alano Club received $2,000 for operating costs.
  2. Bridgeway House received $5,000 to buy laptops and tablets for hybrid learning.
  3. Eugene Science Center received $5,000 to help reopen the center and resume STEM education.
  4. Every Child Lane County received $5,000 to supply beds, bedding, car seats and cribs to vulnerable families.
  5. Florence Food Share received $1,080 to replace canopies.
  6. Junction City Local Aid received $4,000 for food items and staffing.
  7. Kids FIRST received $5,000 to support a mental health program.
  8. Oregon Coast Military Museum received $3,000 to upgrade lighting.
  9. ShelterCare received $5,000 to help install ductless heating and cooling.
  10. Springfield Young Readers received $2,500 to buy and ship books.
  11. SquareOne Villages received $9,000 to add electrical wiring and wall heaters at Opportunity Village Eugene.
  12. Lane Senior Support Coalition Corp. received $5,000 to help low-income seniors.

Regional

  1. Oregon Energy Fund received $5,000 for emergency energy bill aid in Coos and Curry counties.
  2. The ALS Association Oregon and SW Washington Chapter received $2,500 for support services to approximately 75 families.